Matthew 6:34 Therefore do not think about tomorrow:

KJV Verse: 

Mat 6:34 Take therefore no thought for the morrow: for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself. Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

You don't really want to worry in the immediate future. Because, the immediate future? It is going to worry during itself. Sufficient for the day, the problems during it.

Hidden Meaning: 

Lots of surprising things here. The common Biblical translation of this verse again doesn't quite fit the form of the verb. The final phrase contains to However, unlike many verses in the KJV referencing "evil," the Greek used here is much closer to our English concept of the idea.

The Greek word translated either as "therefore" either emphasizes the truth of something ("certainly", "really") or it simply continues an existing narrative. However, the narrative isn't really continued in this verse.

"Take...thought" is a Greek word that means "to care for", "be anxious about," and "to meditate upon." It has most of the sense of the way we use "worry" in English.

The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. More about the Greek negative in this article.

The word translated as "for" is a preposition that primarily means "into" a place, "until" a time," but it also means "concerning" so it could mean "worry about". However, if we use its most common meaning "it", we get "in the short run" or "in the immediate future."

The term translated as "the morrow," may be the closest Greek comes to "tomorrow," but the form is an adverb. However, it is introduced by an article ("the") which allows it to act like a noun. The word is an adverb meaning something more like "until tomorrow", "until the morning" meaning "shortly" or "presently." Unlike the noun "tomorrow" in English, this adverb doesn't take in the entire future like we use "tomorrow" to mean "the future". This Greek word always communicates the idea of "in a short time." The term indicates not now but the immediate future.

The next "for" is a different Greek word than the previous preposition translated as "for". This Greek word indicates a phrase that provides an explanation or a cause, so "since" or "because".

Again, the "the morrow" is again an adverb meaning "shortly." Here the article makes it function as a noun acting as a subject.

There is a problem with the Biblical translation of "shall take thought". It is the same Greek word that means "to care for", "be anxious about," and "to meditate upon." It has most of the sense of the way we use "worry" in English. However, Greek has as special verb form between active and passive to indicate a subject acting on itself, so if the sense was "worry about itself" that form would be used. The actual form is the simple active future, "going to worry" but not about itself.

The "of itself" is the Greek word that acts as a pronoun. Here it clearly refers back to the "immediate future." However, its form would normally be translated as "during" or "within" when referring to a span of time.

The word translated as "sufficient," means "enough" or "it is enough". In the absence of a verb in this phrase, that seems to be its sense here.

The Greek word translated "unto the day" doesn't mean "today", as many Bible translations have it, as in the sense of now, today, this day. It means "day," generally, or, as other translations offer "each day". It has the specific meaning of the 24-hour day, but it is also used to refer to a time or stage of life as well. It is sometimes translated as "time". It isn't used to contrast "now" with the "future": "today" versus "tomorrow". When the Greek word is used to indicate "today" but usually with the word meaning "this" so you are saying "this day" for "today." This noun is the form of an indirect object, which is used to indicate being within a time or place, so "during the day".

The term used for evil here can mean our own concept of moral evil, but it also means "defects", and "bad quality". The usual term that the Bible translates as "evil" means "burden" like the burdens of life. However, the word used here means plain old "badness" and "evil," specifically moral evil, character flaws and defects. Christ seems to use it to mean "problems". See this article for more information about the terms translated as "evil."

And finally, the word translated as "thereof" is the same word translated as "of itself" above, in the same form. Again, its form would normally be translated as "during" or "within" when referring to a span of time.

Wordplay: 

This uses three different ways to say "during" a span of time, repeating one of them. 

The Spoken Version: 

“You all,” he continued happily, “certainly don’t want to worry about tomorrow—because tomorrow? It is going to worry about itself! Enough for today?” He asked merrily. “The hardships of today!” He answered.

Vocabulary: 

μὴ (partic) "ni" is from me, which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

οὖν (adv) "Therefore" is from oun, which means "certainly", "in fact", "really", "in fact," "so" and "then" (continuing a narrative), and "then" and "therefore."

μεριμνήσητε (2nd pl fut ind act or 2nd pl aor subj act) "Take...thought" is from merimnao , which means to "care for", "be anxious about", "meditate upon", "to be cumbered with many cares,"and "to be treated with anxious care [passive]."

εἰς (prep) "For" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν αὔριον, (noun sg fem acc) "The morrow" is from aurion, which means "tomorrow," "tomorrow at this time", and, as an adverb, "on the morrow", "till morning", "presently," and "shortly."

(article sg fem nom) "The" is from hos, an adverb which means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that."

γὰρ (partic ) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

αὔριον (noun sg fem nom) "Morrow" is from aurion, which means "tomorrow at this time", "on the morrow", "till morning", "presently," and "shortly."

μεριμνήσει (3rd sg fut ind act) "Shall take thought" is from merimnao , which means to "care for", "be anxious about", "meditate upon", "to be cumbered with many cares,"and "to be treated with anxious care [passive]."

αὑτῆς: (adj sg fem gen) "Of itself" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord."

ἀρκετὸν (adj sg neut nom ) "Sufficient" is from arketos, which means "sufficient", "satisfactory [of people]," and "it is enough." It is the adjective form of arkeo, which means "to ward off," and "to keep off" and which is used to mean "to be strong enough", "to be a match for," and "to be satisfied with."

τῇ ἡμέρᾳ (noun sg fem dat) "Unto the day" is from hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)."

κακία (noun sg fem nom) "Evil" is from kakia, discussed above, which means "badness in quality", "incapacity", "defects", "cowardice", "faint-heartedness", "moral badness", "vice", "ill-repute", "dishonor", "hurt", "damage done or suffered," “wicked,” “slanderous,” and “cowardly.”

αὐτῆς. (adj sg fem gen) "Thereof" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord."

Mar 23 2017

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