Matthew 25:30 And cast ye the unprofitable servant into outer darkness:

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:30 And cast ye the unprofitable servant into outer darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And [all of you], toss out the useless servant into the darkness, the outside, where there is going to be whining and teeth chattering.

Hidden Meaning: 

"Unprofitable" is from a word Christ uses rarely that means means "useless", but also "unprofitable", which is why it is used here.

"Cast ye" is from a verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out", "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT. However, Christ often uses this word and its root word like we use the word "toss" for light or humorous effect. It is addressed to all his listeners.

The rest of this phrase is one of Christ's common phrases, one that is clearly exaggerated for the sake of humor. A lot of these words have double meanings.

The word translated as "darkness" means "darkness" and "gloom" and it is a metaphor in Greek for ignorance and the nether world. It is introduced with an article "the" so it acts as a noun.

The word translated as "outer" is the adjective that means "more outside," and it is preceded by an article, so it acts also as a noun.

The word translated as "there" means "there" or "in that place" but it also means "the intelligible world," that is, the world we understand. It refers to a place much more strongly than our word "there" which can be a simple helper to introduce a verb og being.

When the verb "to be" appears in the future passive and so it is translated as "shall be," but in Greek, it doesn't require the word "there" to mean something like "there will me."

The "weeping" come from a noun form of the verb "weep"which means "to weep", "to cry", "to lament," and "to wail." However, since it is only used in this phrase, perhaps "whining" fit best.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also."

The word translated as "gnashing" which primarily mens "biting."

The word translated as "teeth" means tooth but it is a metaphor for the pain of grief.

Wordplay: 

 The "gnashing of teeth" phrase captures both the sense of what we call "back biting" among people and the pain of loss.

The "darkness" is a metaphor for the netherworld. 

 

The Spoken Version: 

"And," he continued, making a gesture addressing the group. "Toss the useless servant out! Into...."

He paused as if thinking about where. Then he snapped his fingers as if he just got an idea.

"The darkness!" he exclaimed. "The outside, where..."

He paused again so everyone could join him.

"There is going to be whining and teeth chattering," they all said the familiar phrase together, laughing.

Vocabulary: 

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τὸν ἀχρεῖον [uncommon](adj sg masc acc) "Unprofitable" is from achreios, which means "useless", "unprofitable", esp. "unfit for war", "helpless", "foolish", and "without cause."

δοῦλον (noun sg masc acc)"The servant" is from doulos, which means a "slave," a "born bondsman," or "one made a slave." -- The noun translated as "servant" means "slave." It is translated as "servant" to update the Bible.

ἐκβάλετε (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Cast out" is from ekballo and means "throw out", "cast out of a place,"and "expose." Ek means "out of", "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter." -- "Cast out" is from a verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out", "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT.

εἰς "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὸ σκότος (noun sg neut acc) "The darkness" is from skotos, which means "darkness", "gloom", "blindness," and "dizziness." It is a metaphor in Greek for ignorance and the nether world.

τὸ ἐξώτερον: (adj sg masc acc) "Outer" is from exoteros, which means "outer" and "utter," and literally means "more outside."

ἐκεῖ (adv) "There" is from ekei, which means "there", "in that place," and in philosophy means "the intelligible world."

ἔσται (3rd sg fut ind mid) "Shall be" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

κλαυθμὸς (noun sg masc nom) "Weeping" is from klauthmos which means "a weeping."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

βρυγμὸς (noun sg masc nom) "Gnashing" is from brugmos , which means "biting", "gobbling," and "chattering."

τῶν ὀδόντων. (noun pl masc gen) "Of teeth" is from odous, which means "tooth", "anything pointed", "prong", "spike", "peak," and "tooth [of a saw]." It is a metaphor for the pain of grief.

Oct 15 2016