Matthew 25:29  For unto every one that hath shall be given,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:29 For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

this is because to anyone having to every one it is going to be given and it is going to overflow: but concerning anyone who doesn't think he has, even what he has shall be taken away from him.

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse echoes Mat 13:12 but the differences in phrasing are instructive. One difference, the type of negative used, is a big difference. Christ seems to be saying that everyone has, but some don't think that they have. Also, as we noted earlier about that verse, the "what they have" is undefined. In the earlier verse, the topic was knowledge. Here, it is money, but money as symbolic of being productive in life.

The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, the prevent a run-on sentence, as a "this is because..." to start a new sentence. More simply, it is just translated as "Because."

"Unto...one" is a pronoun that means primarily "anything" or "anyone." It is in the form of an indirect object, which is where the "unto" comes from but in Greek, this form can also be used to describe a benefit, "for anyone" or possession, "of anyone's own. This pronoun is the same form in masculine, feminine, and neuter.

The word translated as "that hath" is from the verb meaning "to have" or "to possesses," but it is in the form of an adjective, so, "having." This appears after the "unto...one".

The word translated as "every" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everyone" or "everything." It is in a form that can either be masculine or feminine. Structurally, this word is very far from the word translated as "unto...one" with a verb acting as an adjective in between. This word doesn't appear at all in the earlier quote. It also is in the form of an indirect object but its position would make it the indirect object of the following verb "given."

"Shall be given" is a verb which means "to give", "to grant", and "to deliver." It is the world almost always translated as "give" in the Gospels. It is in the future, passive form so "he shall be given" or "it shall be given." Notice, neither of the two previous "one" not "every" were in the form of a subject so the subject is unclear. This is in the masculine form.

"He shall have in abundance" is the verb that means "to be over and above," "to be superior," and, in a negative sense, "to be superfluous." It is in the future, passive, so "he will be made superior," "he will abound", and "he will overflow. " Again, there is no clear subject so "he will" or "it will."

The "from him" is different in the actual Greek sources than in the KJV source. In the source, it is the pronoun used to start the previous phrase, the one that means "anyone", "someone," and "anything." However, the form is different, being a possessive form, that, again, has a lot of different uses but more are covered by "of anyone". Here the sense seems to be "concerning

The word translated as "that hath" is from the verb meaning "to have" or "to possesses," but it is in the form of an adjective, so, "having." The form follows the "of him" above.

Most interesting here is the negative used. It is different than the negative in Mat 13:12. The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used as it was in the earlier verse. To capture this sense, we have to add "doesn't want to have" or "doesn't think he has" in the translation. In Greek, these two forms of negative are never interchangeable.

The Greek word translated as "even" is usually used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

"Shall be taken away" is an interesting translation of a verb , which primarily means "to lift," and also means "to raise up", "to take up", "to raise a child", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove." Christ usually uses it to mean "remove." In the previous verse, Mat 25:28, it was translated as "take."

The Spoken Version: 

"Because," he continued, "to anyone having..."

He gestured to indicate to all three servants and then more broadly to the entire group.

"To all," he said joyfully. "It will be given and it will overflow."

He gestured as if he was throwing out gifts to everyone.

"But," he said sadly, looking down, "concerning anyone who doesn't think he has, even what he has will be taken away from him.

 

Vocabulary: 

τῷ (pron sg dat) "Unto...one" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

γὰρ "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

ἔχοντι (part sg pres act masc dat) "That hath" is from echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

παντὶ (adj sg masc dat) "Every" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

δοθήσεται (3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be given" is from didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

περισσευθήσεται: (verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "He shall have abundance" is a single word, perisseuo, which means "to be over and above", "to go beyond", "to abound in", "to be superior," and, in a negative sense, "to be superfluous." In the passive, "to be made to abound," and, of time, "to be made longer."

τοῦ (pron sg gen ) "From him" is from pron sg dat) "Unto...one" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

δὲ "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

μὴ "Not" is from me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. --

ἔχοντος (part sg pres act masc gen)"That hath" is from echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

καὶ "Even" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

(pron sg neut acc) "That which" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

ἔχει (3rd sg pres ind act) "he hath" is from echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

ἀρθήσεται (3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be taken away" is from airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove."

ἀπ᾽ "From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause. -

αὐτοῦ. (adj sg masc gen) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

Related Verses: 

Oct 14 2016