Matthew 25:46 And these shall go away into everlasting punishment:

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:46 And these shall go away into everlasting punishment: but the righteous into life eternal.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And these are going to depart into lifelong pruning, but the virtuous into lifelong life.

Hidden Meaning: 

Lots of hidden stuff here. As we usually see, the Greek is not nearly as damning as the English. Actually, it is a lot more interesting, especially if we understand that what gets translated as "hell" in the previous verse, Mat 25:45, actually means a trash dump.

"Shall go away" is a verb that means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life." In English, "depart" works best because we used "departed" to mean "dead" as well.

"Everlasting" is an adjective based on the word that means "lifetime," "age" or "eon." It has the sense of "perpetual" or "ageless," but "of a lifetime" or "of the ages" usually works for a different perspective. Notice, from the word below, this refers to the "pruning" of a lifetime" or "the pruning" of the age, not eternal punishment.

The word translated as "punishment" means the pruning of trees. From there, you get the meaning of "curb" and "restrain", stopping a certain behavior, so, "chastisement." The idea of "punish" is a bit of a reach. In the context of the theme of productivity, which is hidden in much of this chapter, including in the words translated as 'do" in the previous verse, Mat 25:45, the term is well chosen. Trees (like fields) are Christ's symbols for the productivity of existing assets. The idea of pruning fits well with the fire of the trash heap in that verse as well.

"Everlasting" is an adjective based on the word that means "lifetime," "age" or "eon." It has the sense of "lifelong," "perpetual" or "ageless," but "of a lifetime" or "of the ages" works from a different perspective. Using this word with the following word is a bit of word play.

The word here as "the righteous" is an adjective that means "virtuous" When introduced by an article the adjective becomes a noun, "the virtuous" or "those that do what is right."

The word translated as "life" means "living" but it also means "substance", "existence," and "property." Christ uses it to mean "existence" beyond physical life.

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "everlasting" comes from another word that also means "life" or "lifetime." It is used twice here, one time with a different word for "life." 

The Spoken Version: 

"And these" he continued seriously, again indicating those on his left, "a going to depart into lifelong pruning."

"But the righteous," he finished more cheerfully, "into lifelong life."

Vocabulary: 

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -

ἀπελεύσονται (verb 3rd pl fut ind mid) "Shall go away" is from aperchomai, which means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

οὗτοι (adj pl masc nom) "These" is from houtos, which as an adjective means "this", "that", "the nearer." As an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why."

εἰς” "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

κόλασιν (noun sg fem acc) "Punishment" is from kolasis, which primarily means "checking the growth of trees," and from that idea, "chastisement" and "correction." this is the only time this word is used in the Gospels.

αἰώνιον, (adj sg fem acc) "Everlasting" is from aionios, which means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age." -

οἱ (article pl masc nom ) "Unto them that" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

δὲ (conj) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

δίκαιοι (adj pl masc nom) "The righteous" is from dikaios which means "observant of rules", "observant of customs", "well-ordered", "civilized," and "observant of duty." Later it means "well-balanced", "impartial," and "just." As a verb, it means to "set right", "hold or deem right", "claim or demand as a right", "pronounce judgment", "do a man right or justice", "chastise", "punish, and in passive, "have right done one."

εἰς "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

ζωὴν (noun sg fem acc) "Life" is from zoe, which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death.

αἰώνιον.” (adj sg fem acc) "Everlasting" is from aionios, which means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age." -- "Everlasting" is an adjective based on the word that means "age" or "eon." It has the sense of "perpetual" or "ageless."

Related Verses: 

Nov 2 2016