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Mark 16:18 They shall take up serpents;
KJV Verse:

Mark 16:18 They shall take up serpents; and if they drink any deadly thing, it shall not hurt them; they shall lay hands on the sick, and they shall recover.

Greek Verse:

ΜΑΡΚΟΝ 16:18 [καὶ ἐν ταῖς χερσὶν] ὄφεις ἀροῦσιν κἂν θανάσιμόν τι πίωσιν οὐ μὴ αὐτοὺς βλάψῃ, ἐπὶ ἀρρώστους χεῖρας ἐπιθήσουσιν καὶ καλῶς ἕξουσιν.

Literal Alternative:

In the hands, snakes they might raise up. And if a deadly something they might drink, never them might it disable, Upon weak, hands they are going to lay and beneficial they shall have.

Hidden Meaning:

A lot of unique words here. Many adjectives used as nouns.

The Greek source we use today has an introductory phrase here than means "And into the hands."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

The Greek word translated as "hands" means "the hand and forearm". It can mean both the idea of a helping hand and being in someone's control. 

"They shall take up" is one of Christ's favorite "multiple meaning" words. It is a verb that means "to raise up", "elevate", "to bear", "to carry off", "to take and apply to any use," and "to cause to cease."Christ uses this verb to refer to what will happen to "the son of man," which can apply either to his being raised from the dead or lifted up on the cross. The form is either the future tense or the form of possibility.

"Serpents" is a noun that means "serpent" or "snake." It is a metaphor for "an arrow."

 "And if" is from a conjunction that means "and if", "even if," and "although."  It is a contraction of the conjunction "and" that joins and the particle that indicates a possibility, 

The word "they drink" is the Greek for meaning to "drink". It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate." The form is one of possibility.

The Greek word translated as "any...thing" in the singular means "anyone", "someone," and "anything." In the plural, it means "some", "they," and "those." 

"Deadly" is a unique word for Jesus. It means "deadly" and "fatal."

The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think."

"It shall...hurt" is another unique word for Jesus that means "disable," "hinder," and,  of the mind, "distract", and "pervert."

The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

"They shall lay hands"" is from another uncommon Greek word for Christ that means "to lay", "to put", "to impose," and "to place upon." Christ commonly uses its root form that also means "to put" but this version has a prefix emphasizing the idea of the being putting "upon" or "against" something.

The word translated as "unto" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

"Sick" is an adjective that  means "weak", and "sickly." There is no article, "the," that would normally be used to make it a noun.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "they shall" means to "have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep" and . This verb isn't used to form past tenses as it is in English. 

The word translated as "recover" is not a verb but a common adjective for Jesus. It means "good", "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality."  See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."  The word translated as "well" means, as an adverb, "well", "rightly",  "happily",  "thoroughly", "altogether", and "deservedly".  

Vocabulary:

[καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

ἐν (prep) Untranslated is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". --

ταῖς χερσὶν] ( noun pl fem dat ) Untranslated is cheir (cheir) which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful."

ὄφεις (noun pl masc acc) "Serpents" is from ophis, which means "serpent", "a serpent-like bracelet", "a specific constellation", "a creeping plant," and "a type of fish." It is a metaphor for "an arrow."

ἀροῦσιν ( verb 3rd pl fut ind act or verb 3rd pl aor subj act ) "They shall take up" is airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove." In some forms, it is apaomai, which means to "pray to," or "pray for." --

κἂν (conj)  "And if" is kan, which means "and if", "even if," and "although." It is a contraction of kai anKai is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." An, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could." -- 

θανάσιμόν [unique]( adj sg neut acc ) "Deadly" is thanasimos, which means "deadly" and "fatal."

τι ( pron sg neut acc ) "Any...thing" is tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what." --

πίωσιν ( verb 3rd pl aor subj act ) "They drink" is pinô (pino), which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up." --

οὐ μὴ (partic) "Not" is ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. --

αὐτοὺς (adj pl masc acc) "Them" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." -- 

βλάψῃ, [unique]( verb 3rd sg aor subj act ) "It shall...hurt" is blapto, which means "disable," "hinder," and,  of the mind, "distract", and "pervert."

ἐπὶ (prep) "Against" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against." --

ἀρρώστους [unique]( adj pl masc acc ) "Sick" is arrostos, which means "weak", and "sickly."

χεῖρας ( noun pl fem acc ) "Hands" is cheir (cheir) which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful." -- The Greek word translated as "hands" means "the hand and forearm". It can mean both the idea of a helping hand and being in someone's control. 

ἐπιθήσουσιν   [uncommon] (verb 3rd pl fut ind act ) "They shall law" is from epitithemi,  which means "to lay", "to put", "to place upon", "to set upon", "to put on," and "to dispatch." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

καλῶς ( adj pl masc acc ) "Recover" is kalos, which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base." -- The word translated as "good means "good", "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality."  See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."  The word translated as "well" means, as an adverb, "well", "rightly",  "happily",  "thoroughly", "altogether", and "deservedly".  

ἕξουσιν. ( verb 3rd pl fut ind act ) "They shall" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to have due to one", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." -- The word translated as "have" means to "have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep" and . This verb isn't used to form past tenses as it is in English. 

Most Recent Question

Question:
What did you hear in Jeremiah 29:13? "You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart." (NIV)
Answer:

This is another opportunity to examine both the Hebrew and Greek. There are two different Hebrew words here,  baqash  and  darash both translated as "seek."  There is a play on words here in the Greek contrasting the ideas of "out" and "in".

The Hebrew

According to the Hebrew bible site, Mechon-Mamre, this literal version of this verse is:

"And ye shall seek Me, and find Me, when ye shall search for Me with all your heart."

וּבִקַּשְׁתֶּם אֹתִי, וּמְצָאתֶם:  כִּי תִדְרְשֻׁנִי, בְּכָל-לְבַבְכֶם

Transliterated Greek

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