Luke 17:22 The days will come, when ye shall desire to see one of the days

KJV Verse: 

Luke 17:22 The days will come, when ye shall desire to see one of the days of the Son of man, and ye shall not see it.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

They shall show up, days when you might want, one of these days of this child of that man, to perceive and you will not look for yourselves.

Hidden Meaning: 

Notice how the word "see" seemed to be repeated here? The problem is that, in Greek, those are two different words. Two different ideas are expressed. It is a play on words, lost in translation.  The object of seeing and perceiving  is not necessarily "one of the days", which could be a simple aside. The  object could well be "the realm of God" referred to in the previous verse (Luke 17:21).

The Greek word translated as "the days" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime." There is no article "the" used in the Greek. 

The word translated as "will come" primarily means "to start out" but Jesus usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. This is in the future tense.

"When" is is an conjunction that means "when", "as when", "at the time when," and "sometimes."

"Ye shall desire" is a Greek verb that means "to set one's heart upon", "to desire", "to covet," and "to long for." In English, we might simply say "want". Again, the tense is probably the future, but it could be the verb form of possibility.

The verb translated as "to see" means "to see" but it is used like we use the word "see" to mean "to know" or "to perceive." This is the same verb translated as "lo" and "behold" in Luke 17:21. The form here is not an exclamation. This makes it seem like it is a reference to that earlier statement.

The Greek word translated as "one" means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person.

The Greek word translated as "of the days" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime." The form is plural possessive.

The phrase "Of the son of man" is the common way Jesus refers to himself. It is discussed in detail in this article. Its sense is "the child of the man." The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant". The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "person" and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"Ye shalls...see" is from a verb that means "to look", "to have sight", "to observe", "to look out for," and so on. It is a metaphor for mental sight, "to perceive", "to discern", "to see visions", "to appear in visions (passion), and "to interview." Christ usually uses this word to refer to seeing something symbolical as we might say, "envision."

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

There is no "it" in the sentence.

The Spoken Version: 

"When will we see? See the realm of the Divine?" one of his students asked after the Pharisees left.

"They shall show up," the Master explained. "Days when you might want, one of these days of this child of that man, to see and you will not look for yourselves."

Vocabulary: 

Ἐλεύσονται ( verb 3rd pl fut ind mid ) "Shall come" is erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

ἡμέραι ( noun pl fem nom ) "The days" is hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)." --

ὅτε (adv/conj) "When" is hote, which means "when", "as when", "at the time when," and "sometimes."

ἐπιθυμήσετε (verb 2nd pl fut ind act) "Ye shall desire" is epithymeo, which means "to set one's heart upon", "to desire", "to covet," and "to long for."

μίαν (adj sg fem acc) "One" is heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." This adjective is irregular, having a number of forms depending on sex, number, and case: heis, henos, heni, hen, hena, mia, mias, miai, mian; hen, henos, hen. 

τῶν ἡμερῶν (noun pl fem gen) "Of the days" is hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)."

τοῦ υἱοῦ (noun sg masc gen) "Of the Son" is huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." It is used generally to refer to any male descendant. -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "children". It can refer to all offspring in later generations, just like "father" refers to all previous generations. Jesus also used it metaphorically to describe those who follow a way of thought or set of beliefs that descend from an individual. More about it in this article.

τοῦ ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) "Of man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

ἰδεῖν ( verb aor inf act ) "Ye shall see" is eido which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ὄψεσθε. ( verb 2nd pl fut ind mid ) "Ye...shall see" is from optanomai, which means "to see", "to look", "to aim at", "to look towards", "to have sight", "to take heed," (in transitive) "to behold", "to perceive", "to observe", "to look out for," and "to be seen (passive)." It is a metaphor for mental sight, "to perceive", "to discern", "to see visions", "to appear in visions (passion), and "to interview."

Related Verses: 

Sep 20 2018