Luke 20:35 But they which shall be accounted worthy to obtain that world,

KJV Verse: 

Luke 20:35 But they which shall be accounted worthy to obtain that world, and the resurrection from the dead, neither marry, nor are given in marriage:

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

They, however, being deemed worth of the new era, that one, to happen upon success and of the awakening, that from death, neither wed nor are weddized.

Hidden Meaning: 

The most interesting thing about this verse is the use of a verse that indicates a sense of happenstance in being deemed worth to gain the resurrection. This is clearly intention and thoroughly hidden in translation.

The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

The word translated as "they which" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

"Shall be accounted worthy" is a Greek word Jesus used for the first time here that means to " deem worthy", "hold in high esteem", "command", "deign", and "claim" in an argument. The tense is not the future tense but a form that can be any point in time, past, present, or future. The form is an adjective, "being deemed worthy".

"To obtain" is  a verb that Jesus only uses here that, when used with another verb, expresses coincidence. It means to " happen to be at", "happen to one", "any chance person", "happened anyhow", "happened anywhere", "gains one purpose", "succeed", "happen upon", "meet with misfortune". The form is an infinitive, if we assume "succeed" is the feeling, it would be "to happen upon success."

The word translated as "that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as in a specific place from a word that means "there."

"World" is the word which is the root of our word eon, that means "lifetime", "life", "a space of time", "an age," an epoch," and "the present world." See this article on words translated as "world" in Jesus's words

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). I

While the Greek word translated as "resurrection" is understood that way today, during Christ's time, it would have meant simply "a rising up" or "awakening." It was used to indicate someone standing up especially when awakening from sleep.

The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

The word translated as "the dead" means "corpse", "a dying man," and "inanimate, non-organic matter." Christ uses it in all three senses, referring to the actual dead, the spiritually dead, and inanimate matter. Since it is singular without the article ("the"), the sense might be more like "death".

"Neither" is a Greek conjunction that means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

The word translated as "marry" means, for a man, "to take a wife" and for a woman, to "give yourself in marriage."  It is the verb form of the noun meaning "wedding" so "wed" is closer.

"Nor" is a Greek conjunction that means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

The verb translated as "given in marriage" is doesn't appear in anywhere else in Greek other than the Bible. It seems to be an invented word, adding a different verb ending to the verb that means "marry". This is like our adding "ize" to the end of a word to make it a verb. The root word means "wedding" so this is like "weddize."

 

Vocabulary: 

οἱ (article pl masc nom) "They which" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. 

δὲ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

καταξιωθέντες [uncommon, 1st]( part pl aor pass masc nom ) "Shall be accounted worthy" is kataxioō, which means to " deem worthy", "hold in high esteem", "command", "deign", and "claim" in an argument.

τοῦ αἰῶνος ( noun sg masc gen ) "World" is aion, which means "life", "lifetime", "age," or "generation." -- 

ἐκείνου ( adj sg masc gen ) "That" is ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

τυχεῖν [unique]( verb aor inf act) "To obtain" is  tygchanō, which means to " happen to be at", "happen to one", "any chance person", "happened anyhow", "happened anywhere", "gains one purpose", "succeed", "happen upon", "meet with misfortune". It expresses coincidence with another verb.

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

τῆς ἀναστάσεως  (noun sg fem gen) "Resurrection" is from anastasis, which means, "a standing up", "removal", "a rising up", "a setting up," and "rising from a seat." It is the noun form of anistêmi, which means "to make stand up", "to raise", "to wake up", "to build up", "to restore", "to rouse to action", "to stir up," and "to make people rise."

τῆς ( article sg fem gen ) Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ἐκ (prep) "From" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from." --

νεκρῶν (noun sg masc acc) "The dead" is nekros, which specifically means "a corpse" as well as a "dying person", "the dead as dwellers in the nether world", "the inanimate," and "the inorganic" --

οὔτε (partic) "Neither" is oute, which means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

γαμοῦσιν (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "Marry" is from gameo, which mean "to marry" and "to take a wife." For a woman, it means "to give yourself in marriage." It can also mean to "take a lover.

οὔτε "Nor" is from oute, which means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

γαμίζονται, (verb 3rd pl pres ind mp) "Given in marriage" is from gamizo, which mean "to give a daughter in mararriage."

Related Verses: 

Dec 15 2018