Luke 8:17 For nothing is secret, that shall not be made manifest;

KJV Verse: 

Luke 8:17 For nothing is secret, that shall not be made manifest; neither any thing hid, that shall not be known and come abroad.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Since there is not a secret that shall not become open nor obscure that might never be learned and show up in [the] open. 

Hidden Meaning: 

A word is used twice here, at the beginning and end of the verse, but its importance is lost in translation because it is translated two different ways. There are words both added and left out in translated as well. And, again, Luke uses an uncommon word, that, for once, shows up in one of the parallels, that of Mark (Mark 4:22). 

The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."  To prevent a run-on sentence, it can be translated as "this is why" or "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

The Greek word translated as "nothing" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. This is not the Greek word that actually means nothing, which Jesus uses frequently. 

When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

The word translated as "secret" also means "hidden" and concealed."

The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

The "not" here is the same negative as used above. 

The Greek word translated as "be made" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Christ, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state. It is not the word typically translated as "make" from Greek. 

The Greek word translated as "manifest" means "visible", "conspicuous," and "open." When applied to a secret" we would use "open" in English. 

The word translated as "any thing hidden" is an uncommon adjective that means  "hidden", "concealed", "obscure", and "hard to understand". It is the Greek word from which we get our word "apocryphal". 

The last "not" before "know" is both of the Greek negatives, both objective and subjective, used together. This creates a more extreme negative such as the English "never", something that isn't true and you don't want to be true.

The "shall be known" is a verb that means "learn to know", "to recognize", and  so on. It Is not in the future tense, but a form that indicates something it possible "might learn" and in the passive form "might be learned". 

The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out". It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being under way".  Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas.)

There is an untranslated word here that means "into". 

The Greek word translated as "abroad" is the same word translated as "manifest" above. It  means "visible", "conspicuous," and "open." When applied to a secret" we would use "open" in English. This works especially well when used with the word translated as "come" and the forgotten prepostion "into", so "come into the open" or "show up in the open." There is no "the" used here, but the article is needed in English to make it sound right. 

Wordplay: 

Vocabulary: 

οὐ (partic) "Nothing" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. 

γάρ ([artic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

ἐστιν (3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

κρυπτὸν (part sg pres act neut nom ) "Secret" is kryptos, which is an adjective meaning "hidden", "secret", "concealed", "in disguise [of people]", "secret service," and "deep-seated." 

 (pron sg neut nom /acc) "That" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

οὐ (partic) "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. 

φανερὸν [uncommon](adj sg neut nom) "Manifest" is from phaneros which means "visible", "manifest", "shining", "illustrious", "conspicuous," and "open."

γενήσεται, (verb 3rd sg fut ind mid) "Is" is ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state. -- The word translated as "be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Christ, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state.

οὐδὲ (adj sg neut nom/acc ) "Neither" is from oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter."

ἀπόκρυφον [uncommon](adj sg neut nom) "any thing hidden" is apokryphos, which means "hidden", "concealed", "underhand", "unknown",  "obscure", "recondite", and "hard to understand". 

 (pron sg neut nom / acc ) "That" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

οὐ (partic) "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. --

μὴ (partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. -- The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used.

γνωσθῇ (verb 3rd sg aor subj pass) "Shall...be known," is ginosko which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive."

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

εἰς (prep) Untranslated is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

φανερὸν [uncommon](adj sg masc acc) "Abroad" is from phaneros which means "visible", "manifest", "shining", "illustrious", "conspicuous," and "open."

ἔλθῃ. (verb 3rd sg aor subj act) "Come" is erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. 

Related Verses: 

Nov 30 2017