Matthew 26:55 Have you come out as against a thief with swords

KJV Verse: 

Mat 26:55 Are ye come out as against a thief with swords and staves for to take me? I sat daily with you teaching in the temple, and ye laid no hold on me.​

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Like against a thief, you show up out here! With machetes and clubs to accommodate me? For days within the temple, I sat myself down instructing and you did not really subdue me.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

There are several unusual words here. Many of these words are uncommon and several have entertaining double meanings. In other words, this line has many of the hallmarks of Christ's humor. It seems extremely light-hearted, especially given the context. We must also remember that the Greek source has not punctuation, so this may be phrased as a statement rather than a question.

The word translated as "Are ye come out" means literally "to go or come out," but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true." However, in the Greek, it appears later in the sentence, after the "as against a thief" phase. It is from the base word that seems to translate best as "show up" so "show up out here" work well.

The word translated as "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words.

The word translated as "against" means "against", "at", "by" or "on."

The word translated as "thief" means "robber" or "pirate." In the NIV study Bible, they translated "thief" as "rebel," adding a bit of historical politics into the text.

"With" is from the Greek word that is almost always translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of".

The term for "sword" specifically means a short sword, a weapon like a machete, since the Greek word used here is the source for the term. Christ seems to use "the sword" as a symbol for struggle, which is n necessary. Christ says explicitly that his larger purpose is not to bring peace but the sword in Mat 10:34. As a symbol of struggle, it is the opposite of the cup, which is the symbol of acceptance. Christ makes this contrast between cup and sword explicit in John 18:11.

The Greek word translated as "staves" means "firewood", a "piece of wood", "cudgel", and various wooden instruments of punishment. It also means the "wood" of a treat or of a table. When referring to a person, it means "blockhead". If the people actually had clubs, it probably meant that, but the double meaning is fun.

There is not "for" in the Greek source.

The Greek word translated as "to take"means "to collect","to carry off", "to put together", and "to arrest". However, it also means "to enjoy together" and "to take part in." Again, the double meaning is fun.

Untranslated is the preposition that means "down", "opposite", "separately", "in accordance with", and so on, but when it refers to time, it means "for."

The Greek word translated as "day" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime." It could be either singular or plural, but if the preposition refers to time, it is plural.

The word translated as "in" also means "on", "within", "with," or "among."

"Temple" from a noun that means "holy place" and it related to the word used for "priest." However, it is also a noun that means "sacrifice" or "victim." That definition didn't work in the previous post, Mat 12:5, because the reference was to being "in the temple." However, here it creates a perfect play on words.

The word translated simply as "sat" is not the simple word meaning "to sit" but a more complicated cousin that means "to sit down", "to remain" seated" and "to preside." It is in a form where the action recurs and where the subject acts on himself.

The word translated as "teaching" also means "explaining" but it from the same root as the word for "teacher" or "instructor."

The Greek verb translated as "laid hold" is means "to rule", "to conquer", "to seize", "to control," and "to command." The English word "subdue" seems to fit best since it applies both to capturing him and debating with him in the temple.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ὡς (adv)"As" is from hos, an adverb which means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that."

ἐπὶ )prep)  "Against" is from epi. which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against." --

λῃστὴν (noun sg masc acc ) "Thief" is from lestes, which means "robber" or "pirate."

ἐξήλθατε (verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Are ye come out" is from exerchomai, which means "to come or go out of " "to march forth", "go out on", "to stand forth", "to exceed all bounds", "to come to an end", "to go out of office," and [of dreams or prophecies] "to come true."

μετὰ "With" is from meta, which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to," and "next afterward."

μαχαιρῶν (noun pl fem gen) "Sword" is machaira, which means a "large knife", "large dagger", "short sword," or "dirk." It specifically the type of weapon used for making sacrifices, by assassins, bodyguards, and jugglers.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ξύλων [uncommon](noun pl neut gen) "Staves" is from xylon, which means "firewood", "timber", in the singular, a "piece of wood", "log", "beam", "post"; "cudgel", "club", various wooden instruments of punishment" "wooden collar", "stocks", "gallows", "impaling stakes", "bench", "table",of live wood, "tree", and of persons, "blockhead".

συλλαβεῖν [uncommon](verb aor inf act) "To take" is from sullambano, which means "to collect", "to gather together", "to carry off", "to put together", "to sieze", "to apprehend", "to arrest", "to enjoy together", "to take with," and "to take part in."

με; (pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

καθ᾽ Untranslated is kata, which means "downwards", "down from", "down into", "against", "down toward", "opposite", "separately", "individually", "at a time", "towards", "in accordance with", "concerning", "corresponding with", "during the course of a period," and "severally."

ἡμέραν (noun pl fem gen or noun sg fem acc) "Daily" is from hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)."

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". --

τῷ ἱερῷ (adj sg masc dat)"The temple" is from hieron, means which means "filled with or manifesting divine power", "holy," "consecrated", "under divine protection", "holy place", "sacred principle," and "supernatural." It also means "victim" or "sacrifice." It is related to the word used for "priest." Both come from the word hieros, which means "super-human", "mighty", "divine", "wonderful" and "holy."

ἐκαθεζόμην [uncommon](verb 1st sg imperf ind mid) "Sat" is from kathezomai (kathezomai), which means "to sit down", "to take one's seat", "to occupy", "to remain seated," and "to preside."

διδάσκων (part sg pres act masc nom) "Teaching" is from didasko, which means "to teach", "to instruct", "to indicate", "to explain," and "to give sign of."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οὐκ "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἐκρατήσατέ [uncommon](verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "You laid...hold" is from krateô (krateo), which means "to rule", "to hold sway", "to be the lord and master", "to conquer", "to prevail over", "to get the upper hand", "to seize", "to control," and "to command."

με. (pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "staves" means "clubs" or "blockheads" when referred to a person. 

The word translated as "to take" means "to arrest" and "to enjoy together. 

The word translated as "temple" also means "sacrifice." 

The Spoken Version: 

"Like against a thief, you show up out here!" He said, greeting the crowd with Judas cheerfully. "With machetes and clubs to accommodate me?"

Among them were many of the religious leaders that he had criticized and debates.

"For days within the temple, I sat myself down, instructing," he said to them, while indicating the armed men with them, "and you did not really not subdue me."

Related Verses: 

Dec 6 2016