Luke 10:35 And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence

KJV Verse: 

Luk 10:35 And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto him, Take care of him; and whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come again, I will repay thee.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And upon the morning, taking out two silver coins he gave the innkeeper and said, "Take care of him because if you might spend in addition, I myself, on the returning me, I am going to give back to you. 

Hidden Meaning: 

A lot of words appear in the KJV translation that do not appear in the Greek. And again in this verse, we have a verse with words Jesus never uses elsewhere except here.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The word translated as "on" means "against", "before", "during", "by" or "on."

The term translated as "the morrow," may be the closest Greek comes to "tomorrow," but the form is an adverb. However, it is introduced by an article ("the") which allows it to act like a noun. The word is an adverb meaning something more like "until tomorrow", "until the morning" meaning "shortly" or "presently." Unlike the noun "tomorrow" in English, this adverb doesn't take in the entire future like we use "tomorrow" to mean "the future". This Greek word always communicates the idea of "in a short time." The term indicates not now but the immediate future.

There are no Greek words meaning "when he departed" in today's Greek sources. 

"He took out" is a verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out", "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT. It is in the form of an adjective, so "taking out". 

"Pence" is from the Greek word for a denarius, which was a coin of silver, which had the purchasing power of about $70-$80 today (though comparisons are obviously not very meaningful). It was the standard wage for a day's labor by a general laborer, which for most of human history was an agricultural worker. 

There is no "and" in the source. It is added because the "took" wasn't translated as "taking". 

The verb translated as "gave" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give."

A unique word is translated as "innkeeper". This word is something like the Greek word used for "innkeeper" today, but it doesn't appear anywhere else in ancient Greek. It is a form of the word in the previous verse translated as "inn". 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"Said" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

Another unique word is translated as "take care" that means "take care of", "have charge of", "management of", and "have charge of". 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

Two Greek words are translated as "whatsoever" but they don't mean "what". Literally, they mean "because if", the sense being "because or if you might spend more".

Another unique word is translated as "thou spendest more"which means "spend besides".  It is in a form indicating something that might happen. 

There is no "when" 

The pronoun "I" is used here. Since, as the subject of the sentence, it is part of the verb, its explicit use accentuates who is speaking "I." Saying "I myself" captures this feeling in English.

And untranslated Greek word appears here means "within", "with," or "among."

Another unique word is translated as "come again" which means "go back", "return", "return to", and "recapitulate". However, it is not used as an active verb. It is in a form that is used as a noun. The sense is "my returning". 

"Will repay" is a compound verb that means "to give back", "to give over," and "to transmit." It literally means "to give from".  The tense is the future.  

Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

ἐπὶ (prep) "On" is epi, which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "during", and "against."

τὴν (article sg fem acc) "The" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). Here the form is plural so "those". See this article for more. 

αὔριον (adv) "Morrow" is from aurion, which means "tomorrow," "tomorrow at this time", and, as an adverb, "on the morrow", "till morning", "presently," and "shortly."

ἐκβαλὼν (part sg aor act masc nom) "Took out" is ekballo and means "throw out", "cast out of a place,"and "expose." Ek means "out of", "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter."

δύο (numeral) "Two" is duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

δηνάρια (noun pl neut acc) "Pence" is from denarion) which was the principle silver coin of the Roman Empire in NT times.

ἔδωκεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "Gave" is didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe."

τῷ πανδοχεῖ [unique](noun sg masc dat) "Host" is from pandocheus, which means "innkeeper", "hosteler",   (Not in Perseus ancient Greek but from Google modern Greek.) 

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

εἶπεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "I have called" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." -- "Speak you" means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

Ἐπιμελήθητι [unique to this story] (verb 3rd sg aor ind mp) "Took care" is from epimeleomai which means "take care of", "have charge of", "management of", and "have charge of". 

αὐτοῦ, (adj sg masc gen) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

ὅτι (adv/conj) "Whatsoever" is hoti (with ean below), which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." -- In the Greek source, this is a word here that means "that" or "because." So what follows is a dependent clause, indicating either what they were "saying" or why they were saying it.

ἂν (conj) "Whatsoever"is ean (with hoti above) , which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if)and an (might)) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event. -- The Greek word meaning "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. this is often how we use the word "when".

προσδαπανήσῃς [unique]() "Thou spendest more" is from prosdapanao, which means "spend besides".  

ἐγὼ (pron 1st sg masc nom) "I" is ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself. 

ἐν (prep) Untranslated is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

τῷ (article sg neut dat) Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

 ἐπανέρχεσθαί [unique](verb pres inf mp)  "Come again" is from epanerchomai,  which means "go back", "return", "return to", and "recapitulate".

με (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regular first person pronoun in Greek.

ἀποδώσω (verb 1st sg fut ind act) "Will repay" is apodidomi which means "to give back", "to restore," and "to deliver." It has the economic sense of "to sell" or "to give something for one's own profit." It begins with apo the preposition of separation and origin, the idea of "from" in English, didômi which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over," and "to describe."

σοι. (pron 2nd sg dat) "You" is soi which is the singular, second person pronoun, "you".

Related Verses: 

Jan 31 2018