Matthew 10:25 It is enough for the disciple that he be as his master,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 10:25 It is enough for the disciple that he be as his master, and the servant as his lord. If they have called the master of the house Beelzebub, how much more shall they call them of his household?

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Satisfactory the student that might become like his teacher and the bondman, his master. If the master of the estate Beelzebub! They have summoned. How much more so the household members of his.

Hidden Meaning: 

this is one of those verses where about half of the original meaning in Greek, including a central pun, is lost in the English translation.

"It is enough" is translated from a Greek word that means "sufficient." There is no verb here, but it can be assumed from the word. this is the adjective form of a word that means "to ward off," and "to keep off" and which is used to mean "to be strong enough", "to be a match for," and "to be satisfied with."

"For the disciple" is from the Greek meaning "learner", "pupil", "student," and "apprentice." "Disciple" is a religious spin on this concept. It is in the form of an indirect object, which has several specific uses in Greek.

The word translated as "that" is not the simple demonstrative pronoun, but a word that means "there", "where," and "in order that."

The word translated as "he be" means "to become," that is, to enter into a new state. In Greek, especially as used by Christ, it is the opposite of "being," which is existence in the current state. It is also in the form where the subject acts on himself, "be becomes himself."

The word translated as "as" has a very broad meaning, translating as "how", "when", "where", "just as", "like," and related words.

The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same." Here, it is possessive.

The word translated as "master" specifically means "teacher." It is a Greek verb that means "to teach."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also."

"Servant" is from a word that means "a born slave," or "a bondsman."

The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same." Here, it is possessive.

"Lord" is from the Greek that means "owner", "one in authority," and "one who has power." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family."

The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not.

"They have called" is a compound word that means 'to call out" or "to call in." It has many meanings, the primary ones is "to summon a god". Its use with the term Beelzebub, the Lord of Demons, cannot be a coincidence. But many of its meaning of which are similar to the English "called out" in the sense of a challenge. this is a double or triple meaning here. At once indicated that they have named him Beelzebub, summoned him like a devil, and called him out to battle.

"Master of the house" is translated from a Greek word that means literally "house ruler." It can refer to the servant that manages a household or the owner of the building. The term, for "lord" is different than the ones used as "master" and "lord," being stronger. The base of the word is the same as the one used later for "house member."

Christ refers to the personalization of evil with the term "Beelzebub". It is not based upon any Greek word. The word "Ba'al Zebub" ("Lord of the Flies" or "Lord of the Flyers") is a Hebrew pun on "Ba'al Zebul" meaning "Lord of the Manor". Christ refers to this pun here using the Greek word "master of the estate" to introduce it. However, in Mat 12:27, Christ uses this term to refer to the refer to the controller of demons. For more information, see this article.

"How much" is from a word which means "how great", "how many," and "how much."

The word translated as "them" (and "their") is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "their true selves" as opposed to appearances, which is the point here.

"Them of his household" is from the Greek word which means "a member of the household.

Wordplay: 

The word "Ba'al Zebub" "Lord of the Flies" is a Hebrew pun on "Ba'al Zebul" meaning "Lord of the Manor". Christ refers tot his pun here using the word "master of the estate." 

 There is a play on the big difference between a house ruler and a house member, since both words have the same base, but a very different sense. The "ruler" is also stronger than the "lord" and "master" terms used earlier. 

The Spoken Version: 

“Good enough the student when he might become like that teacher of his and the servant, that master of his.”
“Are people going to make up names to insult us, like they have for you?” Asked Jim.
Many laughed.
“Whips hurt more than words, Jim,” suggested James.
The master smiled as well.
“If, the lord of the domain,” he said casually, indicating himself. Then he announced over-dramatically, “The Lord of the Insane! They have summoned!” He indicated himself, smiling.
Everyone laughed, the teacher with them.
“How much worse those household members of his?” He asked with a smile indicating them all.

Vocabulary: 

ἀρκετὸν (adj sg masc/neut acc) "It is enough" is arketos, which means "satisfactory", "(it is) enough," and "sufficient." It is the adjective form of arkeo, which means "to ward off," and "to keep off" and which is used to mean "to be strong enough", "to be a match for," and "to be satisfied with."

τῷ μαθητῇ (noun sg masc dat) "Disciple" is from mathetes, which means "learner", "pupil", "student," and "apprentice."

ἵνα (conj/adv) "That" is from hina, which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because."

γένηται (3rd sg aor subj mid) "He be" is from ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state.

ὡς (conj/adv) "As" is from hos, an adverb which means to "thus", "as", "how", "when", "where", "like", "just as", "so far as", "as much as can be", "that", "in order that", "nearly (with numbers)," and "know that."

διδάσκαλος (noun sg masc nom ) "Master" is from didaskalos, which means "teacher", "master", "trainer," and "producer."

αὐτοῦ, (adj sg masc gen) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -

δοῦλοςὡς (noun sg masc nom ) "The servant" is from doulos, which means a "slave," a "born bondsman," or "one made a slave."

κύριος (noun sg masc nom) "Lord" is from kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family."

αὐτοῦ. (adj sg masc gen ) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

εἰ (conj) "If" is from ei, which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions.

τὸν οἰκοδεσπότην (noun sg masc acc) "Goodman of the house" is from oikodespotes , which means "master or steward of a house", "owner of a domicile," and "native ruler (as opp. foreign emperor."

Βεεζεβοὺλ "Beelzebub" is from the Greek Beelzeboul, which has no Greek meaning because it is from the Hebrew ba‘al zbûb, which means "Lord [of the] Flies" which is a mockery of the Hebrew ba‘al zbûl, "Lord Prince." Ba'al, of course, was one of the pagan gods mentioned often in the Old Testament, but the word means simple "Lord".

ἐπεκάλεσαν, [uncommon](3rd pl aor ind act) "They have called" is from epikaleo, which means to "summon a god", "invoke (a god) over", "pray for", "call in (as witness)", "call before one", "summon", "challenge", "call by surname", "bring as an accusation against," and "objecting to."

πόσῳ (adj sg masc dat) "How much" is from posos, which means "of what quantity," [in distance] "how far." [of number] how far," [of time] "how long," [of value] "how much", "how great", "how many," and "how much."

μᾶλλον (adv) "More" is from mallon, which is the comparative form of mala which means "very", "exceedingly", "more certainly", "especially," "more", "to a greater degree," and "rather."

τοὺς οἰκιακοὺς "Household" is from oikiakos, which means "of a house", "belonging to a house," and "member of one's household."

αὐτοῦ. "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

Related Verses: 

Jun 1 2017

evidence: 

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