Matthew 21:2 Go into the village across from you...

KJV Verse: 

Mat 21:2 Go into the village across from you, and right away you will find an tethered ass and a colt with her: untie [them], and bring [them] to me.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Go away into the village opposite you and you are going to discover a donkey that has bound itself and its colt with her. Untying, fetch [them] to me.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

As usual, when Christ is telling someone what to do, the language is simple, with no double meanings. However, there is a surprise here because the ass wasn't exactly tied up by someone else.

The Greek verb translated as "go" isn't the common verb almost always translated as "go" in the NT. This word means "to lead over", "depart," and "to carry over." This word, however, uniquely means both "to pursue a course" and "to depart from life."

"The village" is translated from a Greek word that means a "village", "country town," and the ward or quarter of a city. We might say "neighborhood."

The word translated as "over against" means "opposite."

The word translated as "straightway"means "immediately", "directly," and "at once."

The term used for "ye shall find" is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It means "find out" and "discover."

"Ass" is from the word for the common beast of burden. Like the English term, it carries a certain sense of derision in Greek.

"Tied" is an adjective form for a verb that means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. " It is a past participle in a form that indicates something acting on itself so "has been tied itself." The sense is not that the ass was tied up by someone, but rather that it has tangled itself up in something.

The word translated as "a colt" means "foal", "colt," and "filly."

"Loose" is from the adjective form of a verb that means "loosen", "unbind", "unfasten", "unyoke,"and "unharness." So "unharnessing."

"Bring" is a Greek word which means "to lead", "to carry," or "to fetch" and has a lot of different specific meanings in different contexts.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Πορεύεσθε "Go" is from poreuomai (poreuô) which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." It is almost always translated as "go" in the NT.

εἰς "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν κώμην "The village" is from kome, which means an "unwalled village", "country town," and the ward or quarter of a city.

τὴν κατέναντι "over against" is from apenanti, which means "over against", "opposite," and "before."

ὑμῶν, (pron 2nd pl gen) "You" is from humon, the 2nd person pronoun.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

εὐθὺς (adverb) "Straightway" is from eutheos, which as an adverb, it means "straight", "simple", "straightway," forthwith", "immediately", "directly," and "at once."

εὑρήσετε (verb 2nd pl fut ind act) "Ye shall find" is from heurisko, which means "to find", "to find out", "to discover", "to devise", "to invent", "to get," and "to gain."

ὄνον (noun sg fem acc) "Ass" is from onos, which the common beast of burden. Like the English term, it carries a certain sense of derision in Greek.

δεδεμένην (part sg perf mp fem acc) "Tied" is deo which means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. "

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πῶλον (noun sg masc/fem acc) "Colt" is from polos, which means "foal", "colt", "filly," and any young animal. Poetically, it is used to refer to a young girl or maiden.

μετ᾽ "With" is from meta, which means "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to," and "next afterward"

αὐτῆς: (adj sg fem gen) "Her" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

λύσαντες (part pl aor act masc nom) "Loose" is from luo, which means "loosen", "unbind", "unfasten", "unyoke", "unharness", "release", "deliver", "give up", "dissolve", "break up", "undo", "destroy", "repeal", "annul", "break", "solve", "fulfill", "atone for", "fulfill," and "pay.

ἀγάγετέ (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Bring" is from ago, which means to "lead", "carry", "bring", "fetch", "take with one", "carry of", "bear up", "remove", "lead to a point", "lead", "guide", "manage", "refer", "bring up", "train", "educate", "reduce", "draw out (in length)", "hold", "celebrate", "observe (a date)", "pass (Time)", "hold account", "treat", "draw down (in the scale)," and "weight."

μοι. "Unto me" is from moi, which means "I", "me", and "my".

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