Mark 11:2 Go your way into the village over against you...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Go over the the village, that one opposite to you and immediately  entering it, you are going to discover a foal, having been tied, on which no one as yet a man sat. Untie him and bring.

KJV : 

Mark 11:2 Go your way into the village over against you: and as soon as ye be entered into it, ye shall find a colt tied, whereon never man sat; loose him, and bring [him].

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

An example of how a simple spoken phrase can become more complex by putting it into a written grammatical form. The KJV translates the Greek here in a very clunky way, ignoring several words and complicating phrases that aren't complicated. For example. it translates a phrase that literally says, "that village, the one opposite you" into "the village over against you," dropping the "the one" from the phrase. The more modern translations, NIV and NLT, try to streamline it somewhat, but they do so at the cost of changing the meaning of the words. 

NIV : 

Mark 11:2  Go to the village ahead of you, and just as you enter it, you will find a colt tied there, which no one has ever ridden. Untie it and bring it here.

NLT : 

Mark 11:2 Go into that village over there,... As soon as you enter it, you will see a young donkey tied there that no one has ever ridden. Untie it and bring it here.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ὑπάγετε ( verb 2nd pl pres imperat act ) "Go your way" is hypago, which means "to lead under", "to bring under", "to bring a person before judgment", "to lead on by degrees", "to take away from beneath", "to withdraw", "to go away", "to retire", "to draw off," and "off with you."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν (article sg fem acc ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

κώμην [uncommon]( noun sg fem acc ) "Village" is from kome, which means an "unwalled village", "country town," and the ward or quarter of a city.

τὴν (article sg fem acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

κατέναντι [unique] (adv) "Over against" is from katenanti, which means "over against" and "opposite."

ὑμῶν, (pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

εὐθὺς (adk, adv) "As soon as" is from eutheos, which is the adverb of euthus, which means "straight", "direct", "straightforward," and "frank." As an adverb, it means "straight", "simple", "straightway," forthwith", "immediately", "directly," and "at once."

εἰσπορευόμενοι  ( part pl pres mp masc nom ) "Be entered" is eisporeuomai, which means "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It combines "eis," which means "in" with poreuô (poreuomai), which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

αὐτὴν ( adj sg fem acc ) "It"  is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

εὑρήσετε  ((verb 2nd pl fut ind act) "Shall find" is from heurisko, which means "to find", "to find out", "to discover", "to devise", "to invent", "to get," and "to gain."

πῶλον  [unique]( noun sg masc acc ) "Colt" is from polos, which means "foal", "colt", "filly," and any young animal. Poetically, it is used to refer to a young girl or maiden.

δεδεμένον ( part sg perf mp masc acc ) "Tied" is deo, which means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. "

ἐφ᾽ (prep) "Whereon" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against."

ὃν ( pron sg masc acc )  Untranslated is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

οὐδεὶς ( adj sg masc nom ) "Never" is from oudeis, (oudeis) which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter."

οὔπω (adv) Untranslated is from oupo, which means "not yet" and a strong form of "not" and "not at all."

ἀνθρώπων ( noun pl masc gen ) "Man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -

ἐκάθισεν: ( verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "Sat" is  kathizo, which means "to make sit down", "to seat", "to place", "to sit", "to recline at meals," and "to settle."

λύσατε ( verb 2nd pl aor imperat act ) "Loose" is luo, which means "loosen", "unbind", "unfasten", "unyoke", "unharness", "release", "deliver", "give up", "dissolve", "break up", "undo", "destroy", "repeal", "annul", "break", "solve", "fulfill", "atone for", "fulfill,"  and "pay,"

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

φέρετε. (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Bring" is from pherô, which means "to bear", "to carry", "to bring", "to produce," and "to fetch."

KJV Analysis: 

Go -- "Go" is a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Jesus usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

your -- There is no Greek word for "your" here, but the previous verb is the second-person plural.

way -- (IS) There is no Greek word for "way" here, but in might be implied by the "go away" sense of the verb.

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

village  -- "Village" is an uncommon word for Jesus that means an "unwalled village", "country town," and the ward or quarter of a city.

untranslated -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

over against -- "Over against" is an adjective/adverb that Jesus only used here and in the parallel in Matthew that means "over against" and "opposite."

you:  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

as soon as -- "As soon as" is  an adverb, it means "straight", "simple", "straightway," forthwith", "immediately", "directly," and "at once."

ye --  This suggests a second-person form of the following verb. However, the verb has no person form because it is not in an indicative but in the form of and adjective that doesn't required a subject.

be -- (WM) This assumes that the form of the verb is passive voice, but the form could also be the voice could also be the middle one, which in Greek represents a person acting on themselves, which is more of the sense here. People bring themselves into a place.

entered --  (WT) "Entered" is eisporeuomai, which means "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It combines "eis," which means "in" with poreuô (poreuomai), which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." The word is not an active verb, but a participle, "entering."

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure. Though this prefix is part of the verb, the preposition is used explicitly.

it, -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The actual pronoun here is feminine because the word for "village" is feminine.

ye --0 This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

shall --  This indicates the future tense of the following verb.

find --  The term used for "find" is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It means "find out" and "discover."

a There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

colt -- "Colt" is a noun only found in this verse and parallel ones in the other Gospels. It means "foal", "colt", "filly," and any young animal. Poetically, it is used to refer to a young girl or maiden. The form could be either masculine or feminine, but masculine pronouns are used later in the verse.

tied, --  (WT, WM) "Tied"  is an adjective form for a verb that means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. " It is a past participle in perfect form so "having been tied."

whereon -- The word translated as "where on" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

untranslated -- (MW) The untranslated word is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause. It is masculine and the sense is "which" as in the phrase "upon which."

never -- The Greek word translated as "never" also means "no one" and other negative nouns.

untranslated -- (MW) Untranslated is an adverb that means "not yet" and a strong form of "not" and "not at all."

man - The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

sat; -- "Sat" is a Greek verb  "to make sit down", "to seat", "to place", "to sit", "to post", "to take seats", "to convene", "to appoint",  and "to establish".

loose -- The word translated as "loose" means to "unbind"and means "to annul" a law. It is the same word Jesus uses to refer to "breaking" commandments.

him, -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

bring -  The word translated as "bring" means "to bear", "to carry", "to bring", "to produce," and "to fetch." It is the base of a lot of words Christ uses commonly, including the words that mean "bring together", "bring to," and "bring through." Its use is more like our use of the word "get."

him. --  There is no pronoun here, but the previous pronoun applies to both verbs in a conjoined statement.

KJV Translation Issues: 

6
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "way" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • WM  - Wrong Mood  - The verb "entered" is translated as passive, but that doesn't work.
  • WF - Wrong Tense-  The "entered" is not an active verb but a part perfect participle, "having entered."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "tied" is a part perfect, "having been tied."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "this" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

Go -- "Go" is a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Jesus usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

to -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

village  -- "Village" is an uncommon word for Jesus that means an "unwalled village", "country town," and the ward or quarter of a city.

untranslated -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ahead -- (WW) "Ahead" is an adjective/adverb that Jesus only used here and in the parallel in Matthew that means "over against" and "opposite."

of -- This word "of" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

you:  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

just as -- "Just as" is  an adverb, it means "straight", "simple", "straightway," forthwith", "immediately", "directly," and "at once."

you --  This suggests a second-person form of the following verb. However, the verb has no person form because it is not in an indicative but in the form of and adjective that doesn't required a subject.

enter --  (WT) "Entered" is eisporeuomai, which means "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It combines "eis," which means "in" with poreuô (poreuomai), which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." The word is not an active verb, but a participle, "entering."

untranslated -- (MW) The untranslated word means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure. Though this prefix is part of the verb, the preposition is used explicitly.

it, -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The actual pronoun here is feminine because the word for "village" is feminine.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

will --  This indicates the future tense of the following verb.

find --  The term used for "find" is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It means "find out" and "discover."

a There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

colt -- "Colt" is a noun only found in this verse and parallel ones in the other Gospels. It means "foal", "colt", "filly," and any young animal. Poetically, it is used to refer to a young girl or maiden. The form could be either masculine or feminine, but masculine pronouns are used later in the verse.

tied, --  (WT, WM) "Tied"  is an adjective form for a verb that means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. " It is a past participle in perfect form so "having been tied."

there-- (WW) The word translated as "where on" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

which --The word translated as :which is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause. It is masculine and the sense is "which" as in the phrase "upon which."

no one-- The Greek word translated as "no one" also means "no one" and other negative nouns.

ever--  "Ever"  is an adverb that means "not yet" and a strong form of "not" and "not at all."

untranslated - The untranslated Greek word means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

ridden; --  (WW) "Ridden" is a Greek verb  "to make sit down", "to seat", "to place", "to sit", "to post", "to take seats", "to convene", "to appoint",  and "to establish".

Untie -- The word translated as "untie" means to "unbind"and means "to annul" a law. It is the same word Jesus uses to refer to "breaking" commandments.

it, -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

bring -  The word translated as "bring" means "to bear", "to carry", "to bring", "to produce," and "to fetch." It is the base of a lot of words Christ uses commonly, including the words that mean "bring together", "bring to," and "bring through." Its use is more like our use of the word "get."

it . --  There is no pronoun here, but the previous pronoun applies to both verbs in a conjoined statement.

here. -- (IS) There is no Greek word for "here" here.

NIV Translation Issues: 

10
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "ahead" means "opposite."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "entered" is a past perfect, "having been entered."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "into" is not shown in the English translation.
  •  
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "tied" is a part perfect, "having been tied."
  • WM  - Wrong Mood  - The verb "tied" is translated as active, but  it is passive.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "there" means "over."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "man" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "ridden" means "sat."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "here" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.

NLT Analysis: 

Go -- "Go" is a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Jesus usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

village  -- "Village" is an uncommon word for Jesus that means an "unwalled village", "country town," and the ward or quarter of a city.

untranslated -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

over-- "Over" is an adjective/adverb that Jesus only used here and in the parallel in Matthew that means "over against" and "opposite."

there -- (IS) There is no Greek word for "there" here.

untranslated -- (MW) The untranslated Greek  is the pronoun "you" s plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

untranslated -- (MW) The untranslated Greek word means "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

As soon as-- "As soon as" is  an adverb, it means "straight", "simple", "straightway," forthwith", "immediately", "directly," and "at once."

you --  This suggests a second-person form of the following verb. However, the verb has no person form because it is not in an indicative but in the form of and adjective that doesn't required a subject.

enter --  (WT) "Entered" is eisporeuomai, which means "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It combines "eis," which means "in" with poreuô (poreuomai), which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." The word is not an active verb, but a participle, "entering."

untranslated -- (MW) The untranslated word means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure. Though this prefix is part of the verb, the preposition is used explicitly.

it, -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The actual pronoun here is feminine because the word for "village" is feminine.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

will --  This indicates the future tense of the following verb.

see -- (WW)  The term translated as "see" means "find" it is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It means "find out" and "discover."

a There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

young donkey -- (WW) "Young donkey" is a noun only found in this verse and parallel ones in the other Gospels. It means "foal", "colt", "filly," and any young animal. Poetically, it is used to refer to a young girl or maiden. The form could be either masculine or feminine, but masculine pronouns are used later in the verse.

tied, --  (WT, WM) "Tied"  is an adjective form for a verb that means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. " It is a past participle in perfect form so "having been tied."

there-- (WW) The word translated as "where on" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

that--The word translated as "that" s a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause. It is masculine and the sense is "which" as in the phrase "upon which."

no one-- The Greek word translated as "no one" also means "no one" and other negative nouns.

has  -- (WT) This helping verb "has" indicates that the following verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past. This is not the tense of the verb  here.

ever--  "Ever"  is an adverb that means "not yet" and a strong form of "not" and "not at all."

untranslated - (MW) The untranslated Greek word means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

ridden; --  (WW) "Ridden" is a Greek verb  "to make sit down", "to seat", "to place", "to sit", "to post", "to take seats", "to convene", "to appoint",  and "to establish".

Untie -- The word translated as "untie" means to "unbind"and means "to annul" a law. It is the same word Jesus uses to refer to "breaking" commandments.

it, -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

bring -  The word translated as "bring" means "to bear", "to carry", "to bring", "to produce," and "to fetch." It is the base of a lot of words Christ uses commonly, including the words that mean "bring together", "bring to," and "bring through." Its use is more like our use of the word "get."

it . --  There is no pronoun here, but the previous pronoun applies to both verbs in a conjoined statement.

here. -- (IS) There is no Greek word for "here" here.

NLT Translation Issues: 

14
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "there" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "you" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "entered" is a part perfect, "having been entered."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "into" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "young donkey" means "colt."
  •  
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "tied" is a part perfect, "having been tied."
  • WM  - Wrong Mood  - The verb "tied" is translated as active, but  it is passive.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "there" means "over."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "man" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "sat" is a not the past perfect but a word that could be the past.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "ridden" means "sat."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "here" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

This may seem like a overly complicated set of instruction, but it follows Christ's pattern of three plus one, which is the common reason why Christ's simplest statements often seem convoluted. Here he gives four instructions: go, find, loosen, and bring.  "Go" is the spiritual command (the seed). "Find" is the mental command. "Loosen" is the relationship command. "Bring" is the physical command, reversing the spiritual beginning.

Front Page Date: 

Oct 30 2019